Magnet Therapy — sources, health benefits at NaturalPedia.com

Friday, December 15, 2017 by

Magnet therapy, also known as magnotherapy or magnetic therapy, is an alternative medical practice that uses static, or unmoving, magnets to relieve pain and address other health concerns.

Therapeutic magnets are often combined with bracelets, rings, or shoe inserts. Therapeutic magnetic mattresses and clothing can also be bought on the market. However, for the past 30 years, various studies have determined that it is possible that static magnetic therapy devices simply have a placebo effect on those who use them.

Even though there is not enough scientific evidence to back the claims that magnet therapy devices work, wearable magnets are still very popular. The global sale of therapeutic magnets amounts to almost $1 billion annually.

Magnet therapy was put into practice at least 2,000 years ago. Folk healers in Europe and Asia allegedly used magnets to try to treat different ailments. It is possible that the healers believed that magnets could actually draw disease from the body.

Now, practitioners of magnet therapy often cite “the ability of static magnets to alter a person’s bioenergetic fields,” or biofields. Biofields are “energy fields that purportedly surround and penetrate the human body,” per the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Practitioners of certain alternative medical techniques sometimes call this alleged bioenergetic field “life force, chi, or energy flow.” There are those who believe that these fields can be manipulated, such as with magnets, to treat illnesses or injuries.

Health benefits of magnet therapy

Data concerning the effects of magnet therapy on different health conditions is inconsistent. Even though there are extraordinary claims concerning the benefits of this therapy, it still hasn’t been proved for any health-related issue.

Most companies that sell therapeutic magnets will say that a small magnet inside a bracelet or another device can help increase blood flow to the area of the body where the device is worn. This increased blood flow can then help tissues heal faster.

Some  studies on magnet therapy include:

  • A case study of a 51-year old paraplegic woman who claims that magnet therapy completely healed a one-year old abdominal wound.
  • There were no significant differences seen in patients with carpal tunnel pain that underwent magnet therapy compared to those who did not.

There are also those who claim that magnets can be used to treat cancers and increase longevity. Do keep in mind that these claims are not supported by research. Despite these claims, the scientific research concerning magnet therapy is inconsistent and there is not enough data to either prove or disprove the beneficial effects of magnet therapy on any medical condition.

Magnet therapy poses some risks for individuals with medical devices (such as pacemakers and insulin pumps). Before you decide to try magnet therapy, consult a medical professional to avoid any complications.

Body systems supported by magnet therapy

Practitioners of magnet therapy claim that since magnets produce electromagnetic fields that can penetrate the body, they can alter nervous system functioning and boost blood flow to tissue. Magnet therapy can also have other possible pain-relieving effects.

Where to learn more

Summary

Magnet therapy, also known as magnotherapy or magnetic therapy, is an alternative medical practice that uses static, or unmoving, magnets to relieve pain and address other health concerns.

Most companies that sell therapeutic magnets will say that a small magnet inside a bracelet or another device can help increase blood flow to the area of the body where the device is worn. This increased blood flow can then help tissues heal faster.

Practitioners of magnet therapy claim that since magnets produce electromagnetic fields that can penetrate the body, they can alter nervous system functioning and boost blood flow to tissue. Magnet therapy can also have other possible pain-relieving effects.

Sources include:

LiveScience.com

DoveMed.com

BerkeleyWellness.com



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